Jinfo BlogUnique content, big content

Tuesday, 28th August 2012 Sign in to MyJinfo or create an account be able to star items Click for printable version Subscribe via RSS to get updates as soon as Blog items are added Tweet about this item on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn

By Scott Brown

« Blog

Abstract

What challenges do unique content and "big content" create for us as information professionals? We take a look at a review of Thomson Innovation, a patent research tool, and rumours of a Dun & Bradstreet sale.

Item

This issue of the Information Content newsletter has me thinking about the value and challenges of unique content. In an age of our end users continuing to insist that “everything’s on Google or Bing (or insert search engine name here)”, combined with information oversharing via social tools and web news, I find myself occasionally going to the Dark Side. I find myself thinking that maybe everything IS (or soon will be) available for free via Google.

Then I read something like David Whelan’s review of Thomson Innovation, and I snap out of it. At least for a bit.

David’s review illustrates the power and uniqueness of sources like Thomson Innovation, and renews my faith in what we do as information professionals. As he states, patent searching continues to be an art, and patent search artists are getting better tools with which to execute their art. While David points out potential browser compatibility issues, and the ever-present complexity of pricing models with larger sources, the unique value of the product is “an unmatched content set”, incorporating patent information from more than 80 countries and a wide spectrum of content sources. The review is worth reading, whether you are a patent researcher or not. The potential applications to competitive intelligence and business research are intriguing.

But what happens when unique content gets too big? Penny Crossland explores the rumours that Dun & Bradstreet may be exploring a sale again. Dun & Bradstreet, of course, provides access to unique credit information (among other business information), and continues to expand its offerings by purchasing regional business information sources and businesses. At the same time, Penny reports that the company has run into complications in China – in the midst of a market that is at the same time driving the company’s growth.

Unique content, innovative access, complex subscription models, and regulatory issues – I think we’ll continue to deal with these issues, and hopefully only get better tools with which to create our information art.

Enjoy this issue, and I welcome your feedback and suggestions.

« Blog

Benefit from our research

Content and Community

Connect your team with the practical tools, original research and expertise to build and support information strategy in your organisation.

A Jinfo Subscription gives access to all Content (articles, reports, webinars) and Community.

Subscription benefits


Consulting

Our proven processes, resources and guidance will help your team make the shift from transaction centre to strategic asset.

Read case studies, and start the conversation.

Consulting benefits