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Newsletter No.189


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                             FreePint
         "Helping 74,000 people use the Web for their work"
                     http://www.freepint.com/

ISSN 1460-7239                                25th August 2005 No.189
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                           IN THIS ISSUE
                           -------------

                             EDITORIAL
                          By William Hann

                       MY FAVOURITE TIPPLES
                        By Sheena Thompson

                           FREEPINT BAR
                    In Association with Factiva
                   a Dow Jones & Reuters Company

                   JINFO :: JOBS IN INFORMATION
                        Telecoms Researcher
                        Associate Researcher
                         Know How Indexer

                           TIPS ARTICLE
      "Navigating Through the Maze of International Education
                    Resources on the Internet"
                        By Cynthia Padilla
                          
                             BOOKSHELF
         "Enabling End-Users: Information Skills Training"
                       Written by Ann Poyner
                     Reviewed by Richard Gaston

                          FEATURE ARTICLE
"Workplace Health Promotion: global initiatives and internet resources
    for setting up and evaluating workplace wellness programs"
                          By Crystal Sharp

               EVENTS, GOLD AND FORTHCOMING ARTICLES

                        CONTACT INFORMATION

             ONLINE VERSION WITH ACTIVATED HYPERLINKS
            <http://www.freepint.com/issues/250805.htm>

                      FULLY FORMATTED VERSION
            <http://www.freepint.com/issues/250805.pdf>


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              ***  VIP focuses on US and Scotland  ***
        
The August issue of VIP features an in-depth review of Hemscott's 
CoreReference product which provides financial and executive data on
10,000 active public companies trading in the US. A second review 
examines the Member's Area of SCOTBIS, the national business portal
for Scotland.

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                     ***  ABOUT FREEPINT  ***

FreePint is an online network of information searchers. Members
receive this free newsletter twice a month: it is packed with tips
on finding quality and reliable business information on the Internet.

Joining is free at <http://www.freepint.com/> and provides access to
a substantial archive of articles, reviews, jobs and events, with
answers to research questions and networking at the FreePint Bar.

Please circulate this newsletter, which is best read when printed out.

To receive a fully formatted version as an attachment or a brief
notification when it's online, visit <http://www.freepint.com/subs/>.

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                             EDITORIAL
                          By William Hann

Like many people, I'm the sort of person who likes to keep things
simple: straight down the line; no complications; easy to understand
and easy to keep track of.

Best of all, I like practical ways to overcome difficulties -- I would
much rather have a discussion about how to solve a problem than muse
about why it arose or what additional complications might arise.

Furthermore, when something is complicated, and many things are, I
appreciate the abilities of those who are able to simplify those
complexities and explain them in terms that are easy to understand.

I mention this because there are so many complex questions surrounding
the 'information industry' at the moment; not least how you actually
define the industry itself. Many of these questions crop up at the
FreePint Bar, as demonstrated by Penny's summary of the latest Bar
topics below.

Questions commonly include: "How does an information service go from
being a cost centre to a profit centre?"; "How can professional
associations support commercial information services?"; "Are there any
'mentors' in the information industry?"; "How do you find freelance
information research professionals?". People generally want practical
answers to their questions, not a discussion about why their problem
has arisen, or the 'state of the industry'.

I was interviewed this week by an information-industry professional
association about its 'corporate plan'. I liked the non-fuzzy
simplicity of the questions I was asked, such as: what should its aims
be as the industry evolves?; how can the association work with groups
like FreePint?; what areas of the industry does it not serve well at
the moment? The interviewer's clear and concise questions meant I
could give meaningful responses within the allocated time.

I was also contacted by an information vendor who wanted more clarity
about our award for customer service, which we present at the Online
Information show in December. Can the vendor encourage their customers
to nominate them for the award? Absolutely -- we can easily spot
insincere nominations. How do we choose the winner? Is it the number
of votes, or the quality of the citation? I explained that we're not
interested in quantity, just genuine feedback on the quality of the
support the vendor provides.

The vendor was asking these questions because we have clearly failed
to communicate these points adequately on our nominations page
<http://www.freepint.com/events/online-info-2005/>.

So, it is clarity and transparency -- on discussion boards providing
peer-to-peer support, professional associations wanting to improve,
and our responsibility as recognisers of excellence -- that will make
it easy for new people to understand what is being offered and how
they can get involved.

There is beauty in simplicity. Especially when that simplicity masks a
greater underlying complexity. We should all nurture the ability of
those people and organisations who can explain what they do, why they
do it, and why you should get involved, clearly and comprehensibly.

William Hann
Managing Editor and Founder, FreePint

e: william.hann@freepint.com
t: 0870 141 7474
i: +44 870 141 7474

FreePint is a Registered Trademark of Free Pint Limited (R) 1997-2005

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  Sue Hill Recruitment Team - Experts in Information Recruitment

Put yourself in safe hands when seeking staff or job searching. The
team at Sue Hill Recruitment are knowledgeable on both information and
recruitment matters, and professionalism is their byword. If it is
time to recruit or time to move, it is time to talk to one of the Sue
Hill team. Go on. You know it makes sense!
 
Call: 020 7378 7068 e: jobs@suehill.com  see: <http://www.suehill.com>

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                       MY FAVOURITE TIPPLES
                        By Sheena Thompson

* When researching SMEs, I often find they have large US parents.
  To find out more about them I use Hoovers <http://www.hoovers.com>.
  Information on larger companies is free and information provided
  includes accounts, directors, news and competitors.

* To identify industry portals I use <http://www.nri-ltd.com>.
  It's a good place to begin if you are often researching
  different industries.

* If you are trying to find out the latest market drivers in an
  industry, trade associations are an obvious place to start.
  This site provides a comprehensive directory of UK associations
  <http://www.taforum.org/searchgroup.pl?n=500>.

* For competitive intelligence by sector, Competia is the
  information hub <http://digbig.com/4edne>.

* If I am looking at developing channels abroad on behalf of a client,
  I start with <http://www.cia.gov>. It provides an in-depth profile
  of every country in the world.
  
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Sheena Thompson's interest in KM within SMEs has developed through her
role as Information Manager at MSC Business Innovation which delivers
business growth programmes to SMEs within high-tech sectors. She is
also undertaking a part-time MSc at Sheffield University. Sheena can
be reached at .

Submit your top five favourite Web sites. See the guidelines at
<http://www.freepint.com/author.htm>.

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                            FREEPINT BAR
                   <http://www.freepint.com/bar>

                    In Association with Factiva
                   a Dow Jones & Reuters Company

The FreePint Suggestion Box has been a hit. We have had lots of
suggestions and ideas - some anonymous and some posted up at the Bar
<http://www.freepint.com/go/b32871>. Why not send in your suggestions 
<http://www.freepint.com/suggestionbox.htm>?

Also, an article written by Debby Shorley (CILIP's President),
published in the last issue of FreePint, caused an interesting debate
on the future of the information profession <
http://www.freepint.com/go/b32979>.

One FreePinter is finding his feet in the information industry and
would like to know if there are any mentoring schemes available
<http://www.freepint.com/go/b33018>. Also, where can one find a
freelance research professional? <http://www.freepint.com/go/b33049>.
Even though both of these postings have had replies already you might
be able to add something altogether different.

One posting that hasn't had any replies wants to know the maximum
file size for PDF documents on the Web for ease of downloading
<http://www.freepint.com/go/b33100>.

Is travelling by air safer than travelling by road? Everyone seems to
think so but do you know where to find the evidence supporting this?
<http://www.freepint.com/go/b33097>. Who has right of way: a police
car or an ambulance? <http://www.freepint.com/go/b33085>.

Do you know where all the photographs that have appeared on greetings
cards are kept and are they copyright free?
<http://www.freepint.com/go/b33067>.

At the Student Bar, someone wants information for their dissertation
on the rise of fraud especially citing at Enron, Worldcom, Andersen
and Parmalat. Can you help? <http://www.freepint.com/go/s4474>.

That's it for this issue, see you next time.

Penny Hann <penny.hann@freepint.com>
FreePint

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The FreePint Bar is where you can get free help with your tricky
research questions <http://www.freepint.com/bar>

Help with study for information-related courses is available at the
FreePint Student Bar <http://www.freepint.com/student>.

Twice-weekly email digests of the latest postings can be requested
at <http://www.freepint.com/subs/>.

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       ***  Tons of free help with information research  ***

      Over 350 articles in the FreePint Newsletter Archive.
      Over 28,000 questions and answers in the FreePint Bar.

         Isn't it time you visited the FreePint Web site?
                     <http://www.freepint.com/>

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                   JINFO :: JOBS IN INFORMATION
                      <http://www.jinfo.com/>

The Jinfo service enables you to search for and advertise
information-related job vacancies.

The Jinfo Newsletter is published free every two weeks, and contains a
list of the latest vacancies along with job seeking advice. The latest
editorial is entitled "How I crossed from one sector to another".

To read the latest Jinfo Newsletter and to subscribe to receive it
twice-monthly by email, visit <http://www.jinfo.com/newsletter/>.

Here are some of the latest featured jobs:

Telecoms Researcher
  ARCchart is looking for a researcher to join its analyst team, which
  tracks the wireless communications industry.
  Recruiter: ARCchart
  <http://www.jinfo.com/go/j4320>

Associate Researcher
  Exciting opportunity for recent lib/info graduate to be trained in
  business one databases for prestigious global organisation.
  Recruiter: Glen Recruitment
  <http://www.jinfo.com/go/j4345>

Know How Indexer
  6 month FTC in law firm. Set up know how keywording procedures,
  database maintenance, training staff.
  Recruiter: Sue Hill Recruitment
  <http://www.jinfo.com/go/j4354>

NB: There are 16 other jobs in the current edition of the Jinfo
Newsletter <http://www.jinfo.com/newsletter/> and over 80 in the
Jinfo database <http://www.jinfo.com/>.

[The above jobs are paid listings]

Jinfo -- the best place for information-related job vacancies.

*  JOB SEARCHING -- Free search and sign up to the Jinfo Newsletter.
*  RECRUITING    -- Complete the form and advertise a vacancy for
                    only GBP195 <http://www.jinfo.com/recruit/>.

50% discount for registered charities and universities.
10% discount for agencies.

          Find out more today at <http://www.jinfo.com/>

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   ***  Want to partner with FreePint by authoring a report?  ***

      FreePint publishes and sells reports on a wide range of
      information-related topics. We work in partnership with
              authors and share the proceeds of sales.

        If you have an idea for a report and would like to
           talk about it further, then find out more at:

            <http://www.freepint.com/author/report.htm>

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                            TIPS ARTICLE
         <http://www.freepint.com/issues/250805.htm#tips>
      "Navigating Through the Maze of International Education
                    Resources on the Internet"
                        By Cynthia Padilla

There is a plethora of international education resources on the
internet, including data and statistics, publications, news,
curriculum and policy reports, and research organizations. The
challenge is organizing your search so that you can find the most
relevant material for your particular task.

If you are probing for education information on a specific country or
topic, you should be able to find what you need rather easily. If not,
the following suggestions are meant as a general guide to assist you
in discovering your research objective.


General world data and country profiles
---------------------------------------

A good place to begin with is international organizations. You can
find country descriptions, data and statistics, other topics related
to education, and links to other international resources such as
government departments. The following sites have a wealth of
information to get you started:

UNESCO's International Bureau of Education Databanks
<http://www.ibe.unesco.org/international/databanks/dba.htm>. The
portals on the homepage contain the following information:

1. Country dossiers: Member States' profiles along with policy
   reports, education  projects, and statistics. Reports found in the
   IBE's other portals are also referenced here. Available in English
   and French languages.

2. World data on education: contains descriptions of the education
   systems of 160 countries as well as national reports on education
   development. Some of these reports contain data and statistics. One
   caveat: some information for particular countries that is not given
   in the country dossiers portal can be found here. Therefore, you
   should compare both portals. Available in English, French and
   Spanish languages.

3. INNODATA: This portal contains education innovations at the
   primary and secondary school levels.

4. RelatED: Curriculum development and school-based initiatives from
   around the world. Themes include peace, human rights, and
   intercultural understanding.

5. IBEDOCS: Bibliographic catalog of publications (articles, books,
   documents) published since 1971 consisting of policies, curriculum
   and literacy.

6. Global curriculum bank for HIV/AIDS preventive education:
   Collection and analysis of worldwide curricula and teaching
   material for HIV/AIDS education at the primary and secondary
   levels.

Go directly to UNESCO Institute for Statistics 
<http://www.uis.unesco.org> for globally comparative statistics and
other data for education. Other available topics include literacy,
culture and communication, and science and technology. You can also
access the latest news in world education. Available in English and
French languages.

Another site similar to UNESCO's is the Organization for Economic
Co-operation and Development at <http://www.oecd.org>. You can find
current education news and events, publications, forums, statistics,
and country surveys. Available in English and French languages.

The World Bank is another source of international education
information. Although focused on the funding of education projects,
you can search for data, reports, and current projects by country or
region. There are also related topics: HIV/AIDS, early childhood
development, girls' education and health
<http://www1.worldbank.org/education>.

If your interest is in children's education, you will find helpful
information at UNICEF <http://www.unicef.org>. Available in English,
Arabic, Spanish and French languages. You can also go to the UN's
Statistics Division at <http://unstats.un.org/unsd> However, most of
the statistics come from UNESCO.


International statistics offices
--------------------------------

If the aforementioned sites fail to provide you with the information
you seek (country not listed; no ministry or department of education;
inadequate information), search a country's general statistics office
or bureau. Most countries provide education data with their general
statistics. The U.S. Census Bureau has a list of these offices at
<http://www.census.gov>. On the left side of the homepage click on
Related Sites and then click on International Statistical Agencies.


Regional research institutes and organizations
----------------------------------------------

Education research institutes and organizations provide not only
resources focusing on a particular country or region, but also links
to other regions' education systems, journals, newsletters and
library databases. Another useful feature of research institutes is
that they usually provide contact information to ask questions you may
have regarding education research. The following sites are a brief
example of the many regional research institutes and associations.
Remember that you can probably find a research institute near you if
you search for local universities and colleges. While most of the
sites below are referenced in the links of previously mentioned
websites, I have included some which are not found in those links.

The Alliance for International Higher Education Policy Studies
<http://nyu.edu/iesp/aiheps> conducts education policy research in
Mexico, Canada, and the United States. Available in English and
Spanish languages.

UNESCO International Institute for Higher Education in Latin America &
the Caribbean  <http://www.iesalc.unesco.org.ve> provides extensive
education information for countries of this region.

Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University (Japan)
at <http://en.rihe.hiroshima-u.ac.jp> provides Japanese higher
education statistics, as well as education news from around the world,
global seminars/conferences, publications (in English and Japanese),
and its own library database searchable in many languages. There are
also links to national and international institutions of higher
education, including organizations, government agencies and
universities.

UNESCO-CEPES (European Centre for Higher Education)
<http://www.cepes.ro/cepes> focuses mainly, but not exclusively, on
higher education in Central and Eastern Europe. Contains statistics,
online texts, and publications related to European higher education.

EURYDICE at <http://www.eurydice.org> is one of the definitive sources
for education systems and policies throughout Europe.

African Educational Research Network and the African Symposium (online
journal) at <http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/aern/index.htm> provides
research information for African education as well as an online
journal containing articles about all levels of education in Africa.

Association for the Development of Education in Africa
<http://www.adeanet.org> provides publications and research on
HIV/AIDS education and case studies of education programs throughout
Africa. Available in English and French languages.

Lebanese Association for Educational Studies <http://www.laes.org>
conducts research and policy studies in higher education in Lebanon.
Also provides background information for all levels of Lebanon's
education system lists upcoming conferences.

You can find links to libraries, universities, research centers and
institutes throughout the Middle East at <http://digbig.com/4ehcr>.


Miscellaneous topics
--------------------

Here are some more resources that contain information on topics that
may be relevant to your international education research:

<http://www.literacyonline.org>: Electronic resources and tools for
youth and adult literacy communities. Access literacy projects from
around the world. Click on International Literacy Explorer on the left
side of the homepage. There you can compare countries and get
statistics for other topics as well.

<http://www.inqaahe.org>: International Network for Quality Assurance
Agencies in Higher Education contains links to global accreditation
agencies and regional networks.

<http://www.enic-naric.net/index.asp>: The European Gateway to
Recognition of Academic and Professional Qualifications includes links
to education offices of accreditation/quality assurance. There are
links to the following non-European countries: Australia, Canada,
Israel, New Zealand, and the United States.

<http://www.unaids.org>: The Joint United Nations Programme on
HIV/AIDS allows you to search by topic, country or region.

<http://www.prb.org>: Population Reference Bureau has articles and
data, and reports on education, HIV/AIDS, and population. Links to
other websites covering these topics is also given. Available in
English, Spanish and French languages.


Conclusion
----------

Remember that international and government agencies are a good
beginning to your research for international education resources. Use
the data and links on these websites to guide you through the maze of
other international education resources: other government departments,
education organizations, research institutes, online journals, and
other topics related to education.

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Cynthia Padilla obtained her degrees in English and Law (Juris
Doctorate) from the University of Denver in Colorado (USA). She also
studied in Europe.

She has experience in legal research and writing, and was also a
college administrator and former member of the California Association
of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

Her interests include international and comparative law and foreign
affairs. Her memberships include: the National Family Caregivers
Association, California Scholarship Federation, and French Honor
Society.

Just starting her own information research business, Cynthia looks
forward to becoming acquainted with her colleagues from around the
world. Email at <cynpad@hotmail.com>.

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Related FreePint links:

* 'Education' articles in the FreePint Portal
  <http://www.freepint.com/go/p39>
* Post a message to the author, Cynthia Padilla, or suggest further
  resources at the FreePint Bar <http://www.freepint.com/bar>
* Read this article online, with activated hyperlinks
  <http://www.freepint.com/issues/250805.htm#tips>
* Access the entire archive of FreePint content
  <http://www.freepint.com/portal/content/>

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 ***  Information-related job vacancies :: search and advertise  ***

         There is no better place to search and advertise
          information-related vacancies than with Jinfo.

    If you're a job seeker then there is lot of great advice in
   the Jinfo Newsletter. If you're a recruiter then you can tap
    into the large FreePint readership to promote your vacancy.

            Visit Jinfo today: <http://www.Jinfo.com/>

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                         FREEPINT BOOKSHELF
                <http://www.freepint.com/bookshelf>
         "Enabling End-Users: Information Skills Training"
                       Written by Ann Poyner
                     Reviewed by Richard Gaston

One of the 'information skills' covered by this book is the critical
appraisal of material found when searching. Criteria are given for
evaluating print resources which provide us with a starting point for
this review. One of these criteria is 'Author': Ann Poyner is a
'professional librarian' with experience in the (national) health
service whose recent work has been through contributions to training
projects; she now works as a freelance information skills trainer.

By experience, the author appears to be well qualified, although whilst
she carefully generalises through the text, her health service
background makes occasional, uncomfortable appearances: are 'medicine
and healthcare' really 'particularly well served with a comprehensive
range of information sources', by comparison to law, business or
academia? Healthcare-specific search strategies such as 'is there a
particular treatment or intervention or interaction to be explored?'
are also included. As the book claims to be a resource for all (and
not just healthcare), 'information professionals, such sector-specific
examples are unhelpful. These could have been generalised, or examples
appropriate to other sectors included.

Healthcare bias aside, this book is well structured and full of
helpful advice which both new and experienced trainers will be able to
apply to their client training programmes. The book's first sentence
sums up its practical and affirmative approach: 'end-user information
skills training can be fun'. For me, the core resources were the
chapters covering: the searching process and searching techniques;
preparing training materials; one-to-one tuition, and group training
sessions. Each chapter is summarised with a set of bullet points and
then subdivided by clear headings making this accessible as a
reference manual for quick queries.

The book's general technique is to clarify the training process for
the trainer, and its simple, step-by-step approach helps information
professionals to recognise and then train in skills that we might
take for granted. The chapter on 'the searching process and searching
techniques' reminds the trainer to encourage clients to 'fully state
their information needs and build up a search strategy covering all
the aspects that are vital to their search', I suppose this might be
termed the self reference interview. Other key information skills
covered in this chapter include guidance around selection of
resources, and search operators and commands.

The chapter on one-to-one tuition covers all manifestations, from
ad-hoc queries, to structured sessions, to telephone training. It deals
with one of the trainer's greatest fears: difficult people. Two
examples are given: the 'independent end-user' with a misplaced
confidence in their own abilities, and the senior staff-member.
Difficult clients are also dealt with in the chapter on group
training, although suggestions for a more comprehensive strategy than
the following would have been desirable: 'try and identify anyone like
this early in the session and seek to involve [them]'.

This book is a valuable resource covering the training process from
planning to delivery and evaluation once training has been given.
Whilst the bias towards information in healthcare is a distraction,
it doesn't detract from the book's overall usefulness.

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Richard Gaston works in London as a business information researcher
for a global investment bank, with training as one component of his
role. Richard is a chartered member of CILIP - the Chartered
Institute of Library and Information Professionals. He writes for
FreePint in a personal capacity.

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Related FreePint links:

* Find out more about this book online at the FreePint Bookshelf
  <http://www.freepint.com/bookshelf/enable.htm>
* Read customer comments and buy this book at Amazon.com
  <http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1843341093/freepint00>
* "Enabling End-Users: Information Skills Training"
  ISBN 1843341093, published by Chandos Publishing Oxford Ltd.
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                           FEATURE ARTICLE
         <http://www.freepint.com/issues/250805.htm#feature>
"Workplace Health Promotion: global initiatives and internet resources
    for setting up and evaluating workplace wellness programs"
                         By Crystal Sharp

The rationale for workplace health promotion is based on four main
assumptions:

a) Ill-health is often related to lifestyle choices

b) Working people spend the greater part of their lives at work, so
   the workplace is a good location to influence adoption of healthy
   lifestyles (eating well, exercising, stress management, etc.)

c) The physical and social work environment has a significant effect
   on health, so promoting a culture of wellness at work would affect
   health positively

d) Healthy employees who have access to wellness programming and good
   work environments are more productive and loyal to the company, so
   the organization should benefit from lower direct costs of
   healthcare utilization (treatment), as well as lower indirect costs
   due to lower absenteeism and employee turnover.

In Canada, as in other countries with socialized medicine, workplace
health promotion (health benefits offered to employees that go beyond
mandated health and safety requirements) is a relatively new concept.
In the United States, however, where employers bear most of the
exorbitant healthcare costs for their employees, a recent survey of
3,000 employers by Mercer Human Resources Consulting found that the
average total cost of health benefits (medical and dental) that
American companies paid, per active employee, was USD 6,679 in 2004
<http://digbig.com/4efqt> -- workplace health programming has been in
place for decades. Workplace health promotion initiatives take the
form of discounts to fitness centres, mental and physical health
counselling resources, in-house gyms, healthy cafeteria food options,
ergonomic workspaces, and child and elder care, to name a few.

In recent years, wellness programming in the workplace has been
adopted more widely -- even in countries with publicly financed
medicine. A recent OECD report entitled 'Towards High Performing
Health Systems' <http://digbig.com/4efqw> noted that health-care costs
in most OECD countries are currently around 8-10% of GDP. Because
three- quarters of OECD health spending is publicly financed, rising
costs force governments to contain costs or to divert resources from
other priorities. As a result, health-care costs are beginning to
affect the bottom line of many employers, and workplace health
promotion is becoming more widely prevalent in countries like Canada,
the UK, and others with socialized medicine. Workplace health
promotion is also being encouraged by governments because, from a
population health perspective, if workplace health promotion is
effective in improving employee health through promoting healthy
lifestyles, such health promotion could have a significant impact on
the population at large. In Ontario, Canada, where I live, for
example, the regional government-funded Health Units are very active
in workplace health promotion -- working with companies in their
region to help them in their efforts, through education, health fairs
and other programs.

For workplace health promotion to be successful at promoting health
and/or reducing costs, appropriate programming must be introduced,
employees must use it, and use should be monitored for effectiveness.
This is not as straightforward as it might seem, as costs are involved
in setting up programming, incremental improvements in health are
complicated to measure, and monitoring use of health promotion
programs is complicated by privacy regulations and concerns. Most
often, successful implementation of workplace health promotion
requires changing organizational behaviour to encourage management and
employees to adopt, access, and regularly use fitness facilities or
other programming offered.

There are a number of evaluative studies and models of exemplary
workplace health promotion. Dr. Graham Lowe, a consultant on workplace
health promotion, did a literature review for Health Canada, entitled:
Healthy Workplaces and Productivity: a discussion paper (April 2003),
which is accessible online at <http://digbig.com/4egma>. It should
come as no surprise that most of the current literature on evaluation
of workplace health promotion is from the United States.

There are a number of other internet sources for government studies,
best practices, evaluation, evidence, awards and statistics that
relate to workplace health promotion. Listed below are some sources that
have been useful to me in my research on best practices in
implementation of workplace health programs.


Resources offering practical help with workplace health implementation
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Wellness Councils of America (WELCOA)
<http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/>

WELCOA, founded in 1987, is a national non-profit membership
organization dedicated to promoting healthier lifestyles for all
Americans, particularly through health promotion initiatives at the
worksite. Full access to the site requires membership, but free
resources such as case studies, slide presentations, expert
interviews and reports, all offering practical help with promotion and
implementation of wellness programs, are accessible via this site.

WELCOA has more than 2,000 member organizations located throughout
North America, and 11 locally-affiliated community Wellness Councils
(in different U.S. states). Their programs include: the Well
Workplace/Well City - a systematic step-by-step blueprint which
companies can follow; and the Well Workplace Awards - for
organizations that have adhered to the Well Workplace process that
WELCOA has developed. There are four levels of designation -- Bronze,
Silver, Gold, and Platinum. To date, approximately 400 companies and
six cities nationwide have received Well Workplace and Well City
awards.

European Network for Workplace Health Promotion (ENWHP)
<http://www.enwhp.org/home/index.php>

ENWHP was set up in 1996 to help European member countries share
knowledge of workplace health promotion. Its online publications
include news and events, reports, ENWHP newsletters, tools, and
articles showcasing models of good workplace health promotion. This
site is searchable via key-word, and searches can be limited to
ENWHP.org, or the toolbox, or Google (to search the internet). A bar
on the left provides links to various tools -- workplace health
promotion self assessment, a database of survey tools called the
European Toolbox, a European thesaurus for locating HP key-words in 12
languages, and the ability to translate the site into German, French
or Spanish, using Alta Vista's Babelfish.

Public Health Agency of Canada: Business Case for Active
Living atWork

<http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/pau-uap/fitness/work/index.html>
The Business Case for Active Living at Work is one component of Health
Canada's workplace wellness strategies. It offers a number of online
resources - case studies, statistics, research summaries, a template
for practitioners to use in developing a business case for active
living in their organizations, and other material that helps in
knowledge development on workplace health promotion. Health Canada
also sponsors the annual 'Health Work and Wellness Conference' (see
<http://conferences.healthworkandwellness.com/> for the 2005
conference to be held in Montreal in October).

The Health Communication Unit (THCU)

<http://www.thcu.ca/Workplace/infoandresources.htm>
THCU is at the Centre for Health Promotion at the University of
Toronto and is funded by Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term
Care, to provide training and support in health communication, health
promotion planning, evaluation, policy change and sustainability. This
section of its website focuses on resources for workplace health
promotion and planning. Among its offerings are information packs for
introduction to workplace health promotion, influencing organizational
change, and evaluation of comprehensive workplace health promotion.


Awards: model programs
----------------------

Business in the Community (BITC) listing of awards
<http://www.bitc.org.uk/awards/>

Follow a link on the lower right of the page to the Financial Times
article 'Special Report: Business in the Community: Care of Staff is
top of agenda', by Alison Maitland, June 6, 2005; and the Unum
Provident Healthy Workplaces Award at
<http://www.bitc.org.uk/resources/case_studies/3m_hwb_0605.html>

Families and Work: Dealing with work/life balance
<http://familiesandwork.org/3w/awards/2005Winners.html>

Winners of the Alfred P. Sloan Awards for Business Excellence in
Workplace Flexibility.

The Healthy Workplace Award
<http://www.nqi.ca/HealthyWorkplace/Recognition.aspx>

This is sponsored by Health Canada, in partnership with the National
Quality Institute. It is awarded to companies who have met NQI's
healthy workplace criteria <http://www.nqi.ca/>.


Health Canada

Compilation of awards and/or recognition to employers who demonstrate
a commitment to work-life balance and family-friendly policies
<http://digbig.com/4efqr>.

Stress is one of the biggest causes of ill-health. Often stress is
compounded by balancing work and family needs. Health promotion that
is comprehensive in addressing the physical, mental and emotional
needs of workers is one that promotes a culture of health.


Statistics/ background reports
------------------------------

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and
Working Conditions

<http://www.eurofound.ie/>
The Foundation is a European Union body that focuses on improving
living and working conditions. This site offers statistics on living
and working conditions in Europe, as well as projects and current
research. The best way to see what's available is via the A-Z index
at <http://www.eurofound.ie/help/azindex.htm>

Center for Work and Family Boston College
<http://digbig.com/4efqs>

The Center for Work and Family focuses on work/life issues. The
report entitled 'Increasing the Visibility of the Invisible Workforce:
Model Programs and Policies for Hourly and Lower Wage Employees' is
worth reading to understand the needs of lower wage employees (a group
whose needs are not generally focussed on); to know what exemplary
companies do to address those needs; and to understand the benefit to
both parties as a result.

The trend towards adoption of workplace health promotion is an
encouraging one. As research builds the evidence for better means of
implementation, management, and evaluation of workplace health
promotion, it could just be feasible to envisage a better quality of
life for all, within a more caring society.

> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Crystal Sharp owns and operates InformAction, CD Sharp Information
Systems, Ltd. in London, Ontario, Canada. She coordinates grant
proposal submissions for projects involving interprofessional and
interdisciplinary teams of researchers across Canada. Ms. Sharp is
currently co-investigator on a two year Change Foundation funded
grant, led by Dr. David Sharp of the Richard Ivey School of Business,
and Dr. Angela Downey, from the University of Lethbridge, looking at
best practices in implementation of workplace health promotion in
Canada. Crystal is also on the Board of Directors of the Association
of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP). She can be reached at
<crystal@cdsharp.com>.

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  <http://www.freepint.com/portal/content/>

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